Is E3 What It Used To Be?

No comments

I remember being in high school, and the yearly gaming extravaganza would come around. E3! The pinnacle of gaming announcements a time of year where I remember gamers everywhere being ecstatic. You got to hear from the major companies Sony, Nintendo, Microsoft (new at the time). Along with the actual consoles you had so many different game developers. I can’t help but feel that E3 now is not exactly what it used to be.

I know that times change and things don’t stay the same forever and that you can’t expect companies to always get along. The losses of big names such as Sony on E3’s main floor is a massive loss. The lack of console news from all platforms seems so lackluster, at an event that used to be a massive trade show for the entire industry. Now seems like a show that companies have grown out of. It is not only game companies and dev teams either. Iam8Bit the creative merchandising team that was in charge as creative director at this upcoming E3. So many companies have pulled out, and what does that leave for fans and E3 as a show? 

More and more companies have begun to use a more cost-efficient way to give fans the news they want to hear. Nintendo, Xbox, and Sony have all began to live streams for announcements, and it has seemed to work amazingly for these companies. They have been able to reach fans’ desires while not spending money to show up at a convention. As Geoff Keighley, the now-former host stated on a Twitter post “I think E3 needs to become more digital and global.”

Screenshot 2020-03-10 at 9.20.34 AM

E3 is not the only big show in gaming but was known for being the one that brought all corners of gaming together. While that is something amazing to be known for it also puts you at a vulnerable spot, with people and companies dropping left and right. What do you do when you can’t keep enough companies around, how long can the show go on?

The current outlook on E3 for many is that the show is done for, I don’t think that E3 is completely doomed. E3 must adapt and find ways for developers, and companies to keep the desire to attend this once grandiose show.  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s